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SparkNotes: The Great Gatsby Название: The Great Gatsby (York Notes), F. Scott Fitzgerald
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SparkNotes: The Great Gatsby
From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes , the SparkNotes The Great Gatsby Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays. ... The Great Gatsby. F. Scott Fitzgerald ...

Nick's initial impulse is to call out to Gatsby, but he resists because Gatsby "gave a sudden intimation that he was content to be alone. Daisy and Tom appear in stark contrast to the image of Nick: Whereas he is relatively industrious (after all, he came East by himself to make his fortune rather than staying home and doing what is expected of him), the Buchanans live in the lap of luxury. Nick's reservation of judgment about people is carefully calculated ("snobbish," as he even says) and even Nick, the rational narrator, can be pushed too far.

Although both Eggs have beautiful mansions, East Egg is home to "old money," people whose families have had great wealth for generations. Nick, strangely "confused and a little disgusted" as he drives home, finds an equally curious sight waiting for him when he arrives at his house. As a means of establishing faith in the narrator, Fitzgerald carefully develops Nick and positions him both within and without the dramatic situation, creating a dynamic and powerful effect.

Nick Carraway, the story's narrator, remembers his upbringing and the lessons his family taught him. He has come from the Midwest, which for Fitzgerald is a land of perceived morality. These are not people who concern themselves with eking out a living. Daisy Buchanan, Nick's cousin, and her husband, Tom, live across the bay in the fashionable community of East Egg.

The Great Gatsby: At a Glance | CliffsNotes
Get free homework help on F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: book summary , chapter summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis ...

FREE Study Guide-The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald-Free ... Free Study Guide: The Great Gatsby/Summary by F. Scott Fitzgerald ... The Great Gatsby Summary & Study Guide - BookRags.com


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  • The Great Gatsby: Summary & Analysis Chapter 1 | CliffsNotes
    Get free homework help on F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: book summary , chapter summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis ...
    The Great Gatsby (York Notes), F. Scott Fitzgerald

    To ensure that readers don't think Nick is superhuman in his goodness, however, Fitzgerald gives him a mortal side. He comes from a land of privilege and unlike Nick, doesn't subscribe to the adage about withholding judgment because not everyone has had the same advantages. He has come from the Midwest, which for Fitzgerald is a land of perceived morality.

    Fitzgerald sets the women, Daisy and her friend Jordan Baker, in a dreamlike setting, emphasizing their inability to deal with reality. He has rank and privilege and that's the way he wants to keep it. From the very beginning, even before learning about Gatsby, "the man who gives his name to this book," Fitzgerald gives details about Nick.

    Just as Nick prepares to head home for the night, Daisy calls for him to wait because she "forgot to ask [him] something, and it's important. Daisy and Tom appear in stark contrast to the image of Nick: Whereas he is relatively industrious (after all, he came East by himself to make his fortune rather than staying home and doing what is expected of him), the Buchanans live in the lap of luxury. For instance, when Tom chooses to discuss politics, he reveals himself not just as one who discriminates against people on the basis of class (a ), but also a racist. I'm too poor" (curiously, his response also brings home another of the story's key themes — wealth — and as the story unfolds, money and marriage are at its heart).

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